Blogathon: “Recommended By” + Introducing All Eyes On the SMALL Screen to AEOS

In continuing with his “Recommended by” blogathon, Tyson over at Head in a Vice has graciously included me in the fun by posting my review of Richard Linklater’s first of three films in his “Before” series, Before Sunrise (1995), a modern classic starring Julie Delpy and Ethan Hawke.

Of course, I wouldn’t have watched Before Sunrise (yet?) if it weren’t for Caz’s recommendation at Let’s Go to the Movies. As mentioned in a previous post, Tyson created the blogathon to get back into the groove of blogging and reconnect with fellow film bloggers after his hiatus. He opened it up to anyone who read a review by a fellow film blogger, watched the film that was recommended in the post, and then wrote a review on that film to later be published on his site for the blogathon. I’m not going to review Before Sunrise on AEOS since Tyson has already posted my review on his site, but please do check out my post here if you are interested in my thoughts on the film.

I enjoyed Before Sunrise so much, I decided to watch both Before Sunset (2004) and Before Midnight (2013). Out of the three films, I enjoyed the middle offering, Before Sunset, the most (it has a great scene that showcases Julie Delpy’s beautiful singing voice), although I have good things to say about all three movies.

The “Before” series is a trilogy (to become a quartet?) that I’d gladly recommend to anyone, whether you’re a fan of romantic films or not. It’s certainly more than a romantic comedy, stretching itself into both the drama and indie film genres. The trilogy introduces us to interesting, well-thought out characters that begin to challenge each other as well as viewers in testing the dynamics of relationships and how people interact with one another. The series certainly builds, but there’s truly no climax, at least not yet. While the situation these two people find themselves in Before Sunrise seems like one-in-a-million, it’s truly the rich conversation shared between Delpy’s and Hawke’s characters that provides enough sense and realism that by Before Midnight, you imagine it might be your own family members (or yourself) struggling with some of the same issues Jesse and Celine are facing.

So my question to all of you is, if Linklater pens another “Before” movie in the next five or six years, what should he name it? Before Dawn? Before Noon? Before the Solar Eclipse? OK, just kidding on that last one . . . 


All Eyes Small Screen Banner

I’m thrilled to announce the newest series coming to AEOS will be featuring TV episodes of the current season of The Walking Dead (2010-). While All Eyes On Screen has acted solely as movie site, I have been fiddling around with the idea of including occasional television episodes here and there. AEOS will continue to be a site primarily dedicated to movie critique and discussion, but I did want to venture into the small screen realm.

I chose The Walking Dead since it’s a show I’m watching live (or possibly the next day since this blogger doesn’t have cable). If it proves to be a successful choice to feature TV episode reviews for the site, I hope to extend All Eyes On the SMALL Screen with reviews and critiques on more TV shows. But I want to start out small, and I still want to keep the focus of the site on movies.

What are your thoughts on this new series? Are there other shows you’d like to see featured? If you have any suggestions or tips, please share them below, because I would love to know your thoughts.

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Sundance in Chicago: 2 Days in New York

So it’s been an extended weekend for me, ranging from last Friday to this past Monday. I have been incredibly busy, but I’m happy to be back to posting today.

Last Thursday, I got the opportunity to attend the Sundance Film Festival . . . in Chicago. I would have loved to attended the actual festival in Park City, but I settled for Chicago, one of the nine cities that Sundance sends a film from the festival to be screened. Chicago was the recipient of Julie Delpy’s second Sundance film, 2 Days in New York. Back in 2007, the festival showcased 2 Days in Paris, Delpy’s prequel to this year’s film. I had not seen 2 Days in Paris–and still haven’t–yet I was able to very much enjoy New York.

Screened at Chicago’s Music Box Theater, 2 Days in New York was a hit. It was cool to sit among the other 640 something people for the movie experience. Co-writer and star Alexia Landeau attended and answered questions for the Q/A session following the film. Then, the film’s director, writer, and star–Julie Delpy–appeared on the screen via Skype, and continued with the session.

I won’t review the film in its entirety, but I will say that 2 Days in New York is worth a watch for those of you out there who enjoy comedy. I don’t think I’ve ever attended a film that garnered as many laughs as New York  did. Delpy’s father, Albert, actually played her French-speaking father, who shared some hilarious scenes with Chris Rock, each struggling to understand one another. Delpy explained in the Q/A session that those scenes were very real considering that her father speaks little to no English, and Rock isn’t exactly a multilingual guy who majored in French at college.

The film had its ups and downs. There were some parts that didn’t seem to quite fit together all too well with the plot (such as the scene where she sells her soul to Vincent Gallo!), while other scenes sparked hilarity, such as Delpy using the excuse of having a brain tumor to get her neighbor to lay off calling the police for the noise her French family caused. Wholly original, 2 Days in New York is a fun ride, but not incredibly memorable. It lacks a certain kind of emotion to make a viewer care, but it has enough poise to let you enjoy the film and laugh along with it.

It was nice to see Rock play straight to the Delpy’s hilarious protagonist. New York is a different film altogether that you probably haven’t seen. There may be bits and pieces of it that you’ve seen in other comedies, but New York has a mind of its own, in a playful, unique kind of way.

Even GQ took notice of  Delpy’s hilarious performance, including her in their top 15 performances of the festival. Also, be sure to check out EW‘s hilarious portraits of the cast. The film is released in theaters on March 28, 2012.