Love Week: My Theory about the Mother in HIMYM

This week, I have strayed from my usual format–I’ve been late in posting, and I’m only on my measly third post for the week *shakes head in shame*. Regardless, I feel like there’s a post I need to write about, so in the spirit of love (with it being Love Week here), I am writing about my favorite TV show How I Met Your Mother.

A lot of people blog about this show. As often as they post, I make it habit to check out TVLine or EW’s reaction to the latest episode, and I always have the blogsite “Have You Met Ted” on my online reading list.

Now I just read this post, featured today on Freshly Pressed. And while I can definitely see where the writer is coming from, it still saddens me to read about the unfortunate backlash HIMYM is receiving with its recycled ideas popping up in recent episodes. There’s been this massive amount of disappointment looming over this season, and for some reason, I can’t seem to jump on this disappointment bus. I enjoy the show too much, and perhaps I don’t find myself involved enough to be as frustrated as the last HIMYM fan.

Which leads me to theorize on who the mother is. One of the most popular theories is that Ted meets Barney’s half-sister at Barney’s wedding, marries her, and hence Uncle Barney . . . and wait for it . . . Aunt Robin, because of course, fans want Robin and Barney to get together. And I would love to see Barney and Robin together too. But here’s the thing . . . why? I remember watching season 5, and everyone claimed it was the worst season of the show yet. Everyone hated watching Barney throw away his womanizing ways to get serious with a character. There was less to laugh about in the show, and the show lacked that extra “thing” that made it so funny when Barney was in a committed relationship. Now with seasons 5, 6, and parts of 7 behind us, everyone is rooting for the two to get back together.

And then last episode, Ted proclaims his love for Robin . . .

Talk about serious backlash. People are ticked at this, and I am not one of those people. I’ve been rooting for Ted and Robin for a long time, and for me, this is a good thing. The main reason Barney and Robin didn’t work is because they canceled one another out. They both are so similar, that they almost seem to not complement one another as well.

Here is my theory on the mother–why does she have to be the same person as Ted’s wife? I can easily see myself analyzing the situation a little much, but I can’t help but think that there’s even a slight possibility that Ted’s wife and the mother of his children are not the same person. HIMYM set Barney and Robin up to fail (at least in season 5, and partly in season 7 as well)–with so much shared in common, they’re almost too much for each other. For all of the great things future Ted has foreshadowed about “the mother,” I sometimes wonder if HIMYM writers believe in the same formula for Ted and the mother that they did in season 5 for Robin and Barney–so much the same, that they drive each other nuts.

Could it be possible that Ted and Robin end up together, yet Ted and “the mother” still have two children? I will definitely admit the idea seems to stray from the usual character of Ted, but Ted is a different guy since the early seasons. And would it not be the craziest way to surprise viewers? I certainly have to wonder.

All that to say that I’m beginning to believe that the question of How I Met Your Mother has shifted from “Who will Ted marry?” to “Who will Robin marry?”

Perhaps in the next few episodes, things will shift enough that this theory will be completely improbable for the show, similar to how the show functions–one day in, the next day out. But for now, I’m putting the thought out there that maybe there’s another possibility most people haven’t considered. We all know Robin isn’t the mother. But could she be Ted’s wife?

Now that I’ve offended all of the diehard RoBarn fans, removed myself from the popular point of view that HIMYM is not what it used to be (OK, I agree, it’s not, but I still don’t think it’s as bad as everyone’s making it out to be . . . ), and even blogged about a TV show instead of something pertaining to film, I have to ask those of you out there who watch the show . . .

What’s your theory? Do you think it’s possible that Ted and Robin could end up together? Do you think the mother and Ted’s wife could be different people? Weigh in and share your thoughts.

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The 5 Worst Movies I Saw in 2011

While unfortunately, I can’t include the latest Twilight, Nic Cage’s most recent debacle Trespass, or the Adam Sandler slip-up Jack and Jill because I didn’t bother seeing any one of those, there were five shining, terrible gems that worked hard to make this list.

5. Abduction/ The Hangover Pt. 2

Two movies tie for this spot because while both had their entertaining moments, both were pretty bad. Abduction had as many laughable moments as the second Hangover, while Taylor Lautner tried far too hard to be a young Jason Bourne. I will admit that some of the fight sequences were impressive on Lautner’s end, but between the over-dramatic dialogue and failed attempt to issue a sort of suspense that wasn’t quickly followed by a laugh, the script, Lautner, and the poorly used supporting cast made this movie all the more a mess and even painful to watch at times.

The Hangover Pt. 2 reigns as the biggest disappointment for a sequel for me.  Director Todd Philips took the formula that made the original a great hit and decided to repeat it action for action rather than employ any form of originality in this movie. For having such a hilarious leading cast under his belt, Philips really blew this great opportunity to make a hilarious sequel.

4) Bad Teacher

Bad Teacher was just a bad movie. It’s a great example of how to bring movie-goers in on opening weekend, and then allow bad word-of-mouth to drive any other potential viewers away. From the looks of the trailer, Jason Segel, Justin Timberlake, and Cameron Diaz were going to make us crack up throughout the movie. I can’t recall laughing one time the entire movie. Every one of Segel’s few scenes were shown in the trailer, leaving no possibility of surprise or laughs. Diaz played an entirely unlikable character that never felt like bringing you over to her side the entirety of the movie.

3) Transformers: Dark of the Moon

I'm as scared as Shia in this picture.

This was the movie I wasted the most money on in 2011. Michael Bay successfully made one of the worst movies of the year without batting an eye. Shia Labeouf must have been coming off his latest run-in with the police or argument with a random bar-hopper, because his bad attitude was the only visible emotion he displayed on screen throughout the long, laborious three hour-length movie–1 1/2 hours too long. Then, in steps Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, the Victoria’s Secret model that has never acted before, and lets us know within five minutes that that‘s the case. I had to even laugh at Bay’s attempt at jabbing Megan Fox with a line from one of the characters that was something like, “I HATED your old girlfriend. She’s so *insert negative remark here*. Scene after scene of unexplained phenomena continued while I stepped out of the theater to get a break from the madness and go to the bathroom.

2) The Green Hornet

Luckily, the movie theater’s credit card machines were down and I was able to see this movie for free, because only my time was wasted in this case. Perhaps some of the failure of this movie is due to it not finding it’s direction under Marvel, which has made many successful action/superhero movies. Seth Rogen blows in this movie more than other flops he has turned in year after year. Christopher Waltz fills the role of the worst villain I have ever seen in a movie. I have no clue what Cameron Diaz was doing in this movie, because she didn’t fit at all, and the bromanship between Rogen and Jay Chou quickly plummeted as they both attempted to over-induce the audience with their version of being dramatic. James Franco made an odd, but interesting cameo in the beginning, and he is the luckiest of them all because he got killed off so early. I wish Rogen and Chou would have followed in his footsteps, or better yet, not made this horrible movie.

1) Beastly

Beastly holds the number spot for worst movie I saw in 2011, because I couldn’t think of any other movie that was as bad as this one. There are so many problems with this movie, I don’t even know where to begin. Writer-director Daniel Barnz wrote one of the worst screenplays to make it on the big screen. It has to be the poorest attempt at taking a story/movie gem like Beauty and the Beast and trying to make a spiff off it. While Vanessa Hudgens could be a believable Beauty, every last one of her lines were oozing with sap, refusing to let her portray a normal, actual person who talks like a normal, actual person. Alex Pettyfer plays the “beast” character, that instead of losing his six-pack, gains a new set of tattoos and goes bald. “Pretty gruesome,” his character refers to his new look, but Hudgens declares that she’s seen worse, and now we all know that somehow in this pile of sloppy, self-indulgent, pretentious script, Beauty will wind up with the Beast. Which leads me to question many of the movie’s plotholes: Why would her father allow a complete stranger to hole her up in a house? Why does Pettyfer think gifts such as a designer purse  or wearing a mask will “woo” a girl downstairs? Which leads me to the biggest question of sorts, why did I sit through this entire movie? Or even more so, how did I not vomit throughout the movie?

What were the worst movies you saw in 2011? Did you like any of the ones that I couldn’t stand, or would you put them on your worst list too?

Top Ten Favorite Movies of 2011

The time has come for me to finally make this list. I haven’t seen Tree of Life or Drive yet, so I feel like this list could possibly be adjusted after a viewing of either, but despite those exceptions, I still had a difficult time compiling this list. Without further ado, here are my top 10 favorite movies of 2011:

10) Something Borrowed

Of course I’m the only person out there who will be putting Something Borrowed on my list. It rated 14% on Rotten Tomatoes and received poor reviews all around. HOWEVER, this is my “dud” on the list. There’s a reason Something Borrowed makes my favorites list (as I not so subtly bolded the word favorite earlier), and not the list I consider to be the BEST movies of the year. I know it’s not going to be other people’s favorite, but that’s the point, right? This film resonated with me. I enjoyed the story (and the book it was based off), and maybe part of my problem is that I have this thing for John Krasinski. I don’t know.

9) The Muppets

And now to hit the movies that are on other people’s lists. I ended up seeing The Muppets twice. This is one of the most fun films to come out this year. Jason Segel did an excellent job reincarnating this group of lovable puppets that stole many hearts of earlier generations. From the screenplay to the original music, The Muppets won me over almost without trying.

8) Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol

I found this newest edition to the franchise to be the most adrenaline-pumping of them all. Nonstop action, and some of the craziest stunts I’ve seen take place in a movie. There was great chemistry between Simon Pegg, Tom Cruise, Paula Patton, and Jeremy Renner for the latest IMF team. I really enjoyed the craziness of this movie and am happy to see Tom Cruise phoning in another good performance.

7) X-Men: First Class

This is one of the most exciting movies that came out this summer as well as the best one of the franchise by miles. Originally, I had never seen any of the X-Men movies, but on just a single viewing of  First Class, I was interested in the series. When a prequel can draw a non-fan in without annoying fanboys/girls with excessive detail or repetition (or really, just treating them like they’re stupid), then it can really be a great thing. I really enjoyed being introduced to the awesome Michael Fassbender as well as seeing James McAvoy play a young Professor X. And to top it off, a great soundtrack by Henry Jackman served as background.

6) Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Pt. II

I was one of the people who waited in line to see Deathly Hallows Pt. II and left feeling exceptionally underwhelmed, most likely due to steep expectations. After a second viewing of it, I came around and started thinking more about it. Deathly Hallows Pt. II was a great end to such a successful movie franchise. Although many fans of the books were left wanting with having many scenes changed or completely left out of this movie, it’s hard to argue that this movie didn’t move you in some way if you’re a Harry Potter fan. I was especially fond of the epilogue and the tone it left viewers with. There were so many great performances, that it’s hard to pick just one or two standouts. For me, it was exceptionally nice to see Daniel Radcliffe give all that he could to his Harry Potter role throughout the series, and then watch it all come together as he gave his life in Deathly Hallows Pt. II.

5) Midnight in Paris

I’m so happy to see all the critical chatter Midnight in Paris is drawing. I had heard almost nothing about it before I saw it, but I read a nice review by Roger Ebert. In the middle of a summer filled with lots of action, superheroes, and monsters comes this beautiful and creative stand-alone movie from Woody Allen. All the locations filmed in Paris alone serve as a great backdrop and historical picture of past and present Paris. I really enjoyed seeing Owen Wilson shine in a newer type of role for him alongside the gorgeous Marion Cotillard. From the music to the costumes to the humble, but smart screenplay, Midnight in Paris was easily one of my favorite movies of the year.

4) The Descendants

Since I first saw a trailer for The Descendants in theaters, I knew I would want to see the movie. I really enjoyed George Clooney’s previous Up in the Air, and I was excited to see him in an indie-styled film. Coming across as very grassroots, The Descendants takes a family that is seriously messed up and lets us journey with them through an especially harrowing time for George Clooney’s character, Matt King. What I enjoyed most about this movie was the realistic touch. Shailene Woodley gives her all in a dramatic role of playing a rebellious, but hurting teenager. It’s a story about family, making decisions, grieving, and dealing with unpleasant situations, and at the same time, it gives the audience a sense of realism. That pain and frustration and arguing and death is a real thing that happens every day, and shapes you as person as you deal with those times by your reactions to certain situations and interactions with the people close to you in life.

3) The Help

Based off the novel by Kathryn Stockett, the story of The Help is both moving and inspirational. This movie was able to accomplish both of those tasks–move and inspire viewers–without the unnecessary pizzazz or cheesiness that tends to accompany many films of the same genre today. Stripped of all the colors from the costumes, The Help makes you think beyond the movie theater and the book. Some of the best performances of the year took place in this movie, from Viola Davis and Octavia Spencer to Emma Stone. Jessica Chastain was hilarious in her supporting role as well. Although there’s still controversy over this movie, The Help is no doubt one of the best movies to come out in 2011.

2) 50/50

Barely missing the top spot for my favorite film of the year, 50/50 made me cry and laugh and walk away very thankful for life by the movie’s end. Perhaps because the story was written by the guy (Will Reiser) who was actually diagnosed with cancer–and has now survived it and is in remission–50/50 offers the most realistic look at a young person dealing with a rare form of cancer. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is both brilliant and endearing in this role, seeming to act the part from the inside out. A great supporting cast of Anna Kendrick, Anjelica Huston, and even Seth Rogen ties this dubbed “bromance comedy” together. Both moving and hilarious to watch, 50/50 was one of my favorite movies of the year.

1) The Artist

Until this past Sunday, 50/50 held the number one spot in my list of favorite movies for 2011. And then I saw The Artist and couldn’t shake the feeling that I had seen one of the greatest films to come out in a long while. I walked in with low expectations, assuming I would be bored or disinterested, but found myself unbelievably surprised and thankful for the opportunity to see this movie gem. Jean Dujardin and Bérénice Bejo are flawless in this Michel Hazanavicius film filled with great performances, a great score, great writing, and great cinematography. It’s difficult to restrain from overpraising The Artist, not only because was it that good, but also because nothing else remotely similar has come out in ages, much less would be comparable to it. The Artist will probably hit it big at every awards ceremony this year, and rightfully so. If you haven’t seen this movie yet, please do so. It’s definitely my favorite of 2011.

What was your favorite movie of 2011? Did you like any of the ones on my list? What was missing from my list, and what do you think I should see still? I missed out on just about all documentaries in 2011, so I’m definitely looking for suggestions!

Actors out of Their Elements

You know what I’m talking about right? The funny guy getting all dramatic, or the action dude trying to be funny. I remember watching an interview with Jason Segel where he recalled how difficult it was for comedians to get gigs that weren’t comedy. The crossover from one acting genre to another can sometimes be far apart, but that doesn’t mean that all actors are limited to one type of genre. Here are just a few examples of actors who have stepped out of their usual acting habitat and ventured into some ground considered new for their talents.

  • Ryan Reynolds in Buried

Reynolds has been primarily known for most of his career as a B-movie funny guy in young adult movies. And although he’s had a few gigs here and there that have only slightly pushed his envelope, I believe it was his performance in Buried that let the world know that he is far more capable actor than he previously led us all to believe. In the making of Buried, the movie took 17 days to shoot and during the filming, Reynolds developed a bald spot as well as dislocated his shoulder from having to lie in a coffin for over 2 weeks straight. In addition to his minor injuries, he was able to hold the screen on his own with only the support of voice actors talking to him through a cell phone. After this movie, he proved that he really does have dramatic chops beneath the 6-pack and dirty jokes and sarcastic humor.

  • Mark Wahlberg in The Other Guys and Date Night

Wahlberg has been the tough guy, eye candy, manly man for the majority of his career. It wasn’t until The Happening happened that he got slammed for playing a “wimp.” Then, he turns things around and plays a supporting and utterly hilarious role in Date Night alongside Steve Carell and Tina Fey, who very “graciously” played off his humor. And although The Other Guys could have been shortened by about 45 minutes, Wahlberg again was able to play straight (and occasionally funny) off one of the biggest comedians of our time, Will Ferrell.

  • Emma Stone in The Help

Although Stone is only 23 years old, the majority of her roles have been only supporting until Easy A. And even in that film, with a Golden Globe nomination for Best Actress under her belt, she really didn’t hit drama land until she nabbed the lead role in The Help. Stone’s already had another big year with The Help as well as Crazy, Stupid, Love and a cameo in Friends with Benefits. But the 1960s drama based off the best-selling novel film adaptation showed that Stone has a lot more to give to cinema than just some silly laughs or minor roles in rom coms. She’s clearly capable of being a leading lady in more than just another teen movie.

  • Adam Sandler in Reign Over Me

Perhaps I can’t use this example since I haven’t actually seen Reign Over Me. But from what I’ve read, Sandler is able to portray a heart-broken man dealing with the loss of his family from the 9/11 attacks. This movie is on my Need-To-See list. I’ve always enjoyed a little Adam Sandler humor (mainly his older movies–his newer ones have been crap!), but I’d love to see him entirely out of his element playing a dramatic role.

  • Jim Carrey in The Majestic and The Number 23

Jim Carrey is easily one of the funniest actors today. Between Dumb and Dumber and Liar Liar and Yes Man to name only a few, he has marked his place in funnymanland. But he also has several movies that show he is multi-talented. In The Number 23, Carrey plays a man who finds a book, reads it, and slowly realizes that he was the author. It’s a mind-numbing thriller that forces Carrey to be vulnerable, yet still on a mission. The Majestic holds the place for my favorite Jim Carrey performance yet. Set back in a time when the movies were an event to attend, war was raging on, and Carrey’s character hit his head and landed in a whole new place that took him in as a war hero they thought had died, Carrey brought in what I believe to be one of his best performances ever.

Do you like seeing actors in diverse roles? Who do you enjoy watching switch things up a bit?

Mini-Reviews: The Muppets and The Descendants

I’m back after the hiatus with a double-mini review on the latest Muppets movie to hit theaters and the latest of George Clooney in The Descendants.

First, let’s start with The Muppets.

OK, let me just say that Jason Segel is a little bit of a genius. The fun, quirky songs, the back story of how all the Muppets are now spread out, the villain (played by Chris Cooper) who’s constantly demanding a maniacal laugh from his evil cohorts–The Muppets contained enough charisma to charm nostalgic viewers (consisting mainly of adults who grew up watching them), as well as kids looking for new friends and heroes. Amy Adams played a great supporting role as Mary, Gary’s girlfriend of 10 years who’s helpful and supportive, but questioning of Gary’s humanity/muppiticity. Her performance in Enchanted would only confirm with the studio that she was the perfect fit for her role. Segel, already a bit of a dork himself, fit right in with the Muppets and his brother, Walter, who is the biggest Muppets fan ever.

Without a doubt, The Muppets is the family-friendly, feel-good film of the year. Receiving great critiques across the board (just check out Rotten Tomatoes’s high rating for it), and including some hilarious and well-placed cameos by various celebrities, the movie has you wanting to dance and sing along by the end.

The Descendants is on the other end of the spectrum. Painfully honest, with twists and turns that emotionally injure Matt King (George Clooney), the “back-up parent” and businessman first, who’s dealing with multiple issues vying for and demanding his attention. Clooney again knocks it out of the park with a great performance that’s likely to spark chatter at the Academy this year. If there had to be a stand-out performance for the movie, however, it would have to go to Shailene Woodley, who played Matt’s daughter, Alex. Alex, who has just been unexpectedly plucked from her rehab clinic by her father and younger sister, Scottie (Amara Miller), no sooner than later breaks the news to her dad that her mother, Elizabeth, has been cheating on him. But she doesn’t learn this revelation until her dad informs her while she is swimming in their leaf-filled pool that Elizabeth will not be waking up from her coma. Thus, Matt, his two daughters, and Alex’s odd-ball friend, Sid (Nick Krause), embark on a trip informing Elizabeth’s parents the news. As Matt and Alex learn more of Elizabeth’s affair, Matt starts to come to terms with what what to do with the land he has inherited, how he must deal with being a single parent, and having to break the news of Elizabeth’s impending death to Scottie, who’s too young to realize the seriousness of her mother’s condition.

The Descendants is kind of like a really pretty picture from first glance at a distance. And then when you walk closer to it and start looking at it more clearly, you notice the different smudges and the imperfections and perhaps the pain that the artist was inflicted with while creating the piece. It’s about a real family dealing with real issues, and what you see is not pretty, but it’s close to a realistic view of what it actually is. The writing and performances were top-notch, and it’ll be no surprise if it gets nominated for a few Oscars in February.