New Trailers: The Dark Knight Rises, The Hobbit

In addition to the much anticipated The Dark Knight Rises, The Hobbit teaser trailer has made a nice, expected visit to theaters now, placed in front of The Adventures of Tin Tin, which Peter Jackson is producer of. Scroll to the bottom to view the trailer and more information regarding it.

It’s finally getting around that the first full trailer for The Dark Knight Rises is out there and ready to be speculated about. Positioning the trailer well in front of both Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows and MI4: Ghost Protocol in IMAX, Christopher Nolan takes a few minutes to talk about his upcoming movie, The Dark Knight Rises, in this article posted on The Reelist.

According to Nolan, the trailer is all that he has finished editing: “I’ve barely started to edit the rest of the film,” he admits.

Interviewers are still pressing him for information on whether or not this is really the end of his time with the batman franchise. Perhaps since he has revealed multiple times that this is his last Batman film, as well as distinctly given it away on the trailer that The Dark Knight Rises is the “final” film in his batman “trilogy,” The Reelist was still pressing for whether or not he would consider producing a batman film in the future. Nolan gladly answers that it’s all going to be circumstantial for any possible involvement with the franchise in the future as well as concludes he isn’t planning on writing or directing anymore batman films after this one: “I think the important thing really for me is as a director and as a writer and so forth, this is the conclusion of my involvement with it.”

With all of the very early hype for a film that isn’t due out for another good 7 months, I still wonder if Nolan’s going to be able to deliver the colossal film that everyone is not only hoping for anymore, but also expecting it to be. He describes his writing process and the point of when he knew things were starting to fit together for the film: “I think really once we figured out our ending, then it felt like okay, we know where this story is going and where we have to land the plane if you like. That’s always very important in any project, with all my projects. I really try to figure out the end first and work up from there.”

To read the full article, go here. And in case you haven’t see it yet, check out the full trailer below.

What do you guys think of it? I was wondering what the disintegration of the football field was all about. Aside from that, Tom Hardy looks villainous enough, and Anne Hathaway might possibly pull off not being awkward in a movie. Possibly. It’s nice to see some of the Inception cast return in another CNolan film, like Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Marion Cotillard. And Gary Oldman reprising his role as Commissioner Gordon looks great, of course, too. Did everybody else notice that Christian Bale isn’t in the trailer much?

When I heard the term “teaser trailer,” I was not expecting a two and half minute trailer. I’m delightfully surprised to get to see so much, from Bilbo (young and old version), a hint of Frodo, a lot of Gandalf, some Galadriel, and of course at the end, Gollum and the ring. The only other big character I haven’t seen is Legolas. Perhaps in the “full” trailer, we’ll get a hint of him, similar to that tiny scene of Joseph Gordon-Levitt in The Dark Knight Rises trailer. This is an exciting and fun-looking trailer that also includes some new faces. Even a full year before its theatrical release, we’re getting quite a bit of footage. Check out the trailer below!

It has Peter Jackson’s hands all over it. I’m happy to see this prequel being done by the same director as the series. It definitely gives it a mode of continuation with the series. There’s really no doubt that this movie is going to be successful, especially to those who are already big LOTR fans. I think the biggest question is really, how will it compare to the LOTR? Will we like the story as much, or will too high expectations disappoint in the end? Martin Freeman, who plays Bilbow, looks promising, and actually very similar to old Bilbo, played by Ian Holm. I’m still betting on Howard Shore to do the soundtrack for this film. I guess we’ll have a full year to wait.

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Yes, I’m Going to Talk about the Golden Globes

And the nominees are . . .

Not going to be listed here. But if you’d like to see a list, they’re just about anywhere else. Like Fandango, or Rotten Tomatoes, where it lists the movies with their RT rating. Kinda nifty.

Unfortunately, I haven’t see all of the films/performances that are up for awards yet. It’s difficult to make it to the theater for all of them, but I can comment on what I know and hope to happen. Here are my personal thoughts on each category, and who I guess will win each.

Best Motion Picture – Drama

I’ve seen 4 out of the 6 nominations. I’m actually stunned Ides of March made this list. Really? But then again, the Golden Globes occasionally pulls an odd nom or two out of a hat, so I’m crediting Ides with being the weird pick. My greatest disappointment is that Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is entirely void from not only this list, but from the Golden Globes as well. Come on! I’m happy, however, to see Tree of Life not present, because people were making far too big a deal out of that film (if you ask me). I would be happy, however, to see The Help or The Descendants win this category. I enjoyed Moneyball a lot, but don’t think it deserves to win over either of those. I also think Hugo is entirely overrated because it’s a Scorsese film. I can’t comment on War Horse because I haven’t seen it, but it’s difficult to put into the mix when I don’t even have a desire to see it. Perhaps when it is in full release, I will reconsider.

Best Motion Picture – Comedy Or Musical

In this section, I’ve seen half the films. My Week with Marilyn was always on my list to see, but it hasn’t worked out yet. I will personally be pulling for 50/50 to win, because it was my favorite film of the year thus far, but with The Artist having the most nominations of the season, I see it easily stealing this win. Midnight in Paris is a close personal second pick for me. It’s a Woody Allen treat and a great film, but I find it unlikely to beat out The Artist. Unlike the rest of the world (and critics alike), I was not a giant fan of Bridesmaids, although I was impressed with Wiig’s writing more than her performance with it. Surprisingly, Carnage is really pulling out a nice string of nominations, but I doubt it will fare against The Artist, much less Midnight in Paris.

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Drama

This is perhaps one of the easiest categories for me to comment on, because I have seen all the performances except for Michael Fassbender in Shame. However, after reading reviews, if I were to bet on who would surprisingly come up and win this category, I would bet on him. Plus, I think those awards voters smile upon nudity, but that’s those awards voters for you. Judging on all other performances, it appears to be a pretty tight race. Unfortunately for Brad Pitt, I don’t see Moneyball nominations faring well at all against it’s competition. Despite my dislike of J. Edgar, I think DiCaprio gave a fantastic performance. And despite my thoughts, I think voters will overlook him again and go with Fassbender. My personal pick would be between George Clooney in The Descendants and Brad Pitt in Moneyball. I won’t even give Gosling a fair chance in this match because I’m still one of the many stunned that his performance in Drive wasn’t considered for this category.

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama

On the complete opposite side of the spectrum, I find myself with little to say, seeing that the majority of these performances are difficult to judge since half the films haven’t been widely distributed yet. The competition appears to be even more fierce in this category when big names like Meryl Streep and Tilda Swinton are included. Although I will be biased and think that Viola Davis is more than deserving of this win, I see either of the former winning this category. I’m also left disappointed with Emma Stone not getting any credit for her work in The Help, but it doesn’t surprise me, unfortunately. I’ve heard great things about Rooney Mara’s performance in the Swedish version of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, but I don’t think she has a fighting chance.

Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Comedy Or Musical

I feel like I’ve really missed out on all the nominated performances this year–I’ve seen only one in this category as well! And that, being Kristen Wiig in Bridesmaids, which I don’t think will do anything. I see Michelle Williams easily taking this win with her performance in My Week with Marilyn. I’ve heard great things about Charlize Theron‘s polarizing performance in Young Adult, but I don’t know if that will come to anything or not. Two nominations are phoned in for Carnage, but again, it’s difficult to comment having not seen it. Although Kate Winslet seems to be an awards darling more than many.

Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Comedy Or Musical

Clear and simple, I would easily place my vote for Joseph Gordon-Levitt to win this category. I was blown away by his performance in 50/50. This is only the second time he has ever been nominated for a Golden Globe. But I think the obvious winner of this category will be Jean Dujardin in The Artist. Again, I’m stunned to see Gosling nominated for Crazy, Stupid, Love, of all the movies to be nominated for. And although I very much enjoyed Midnight in Paris, I doubt Owen Wilson will do anything. Either way, I’m happy to see him nominated.

Best Performance by an Actress In A Supporting Role in a Motion Picture

For this category, the stand-out performance for me was Shailene Woodley in The Descendants. The Help scored two nominations in this narrow category for Octavia Spencer and Jessica Chastain, two actresses that I would also be happy to see win–I think Jessica Chastain has a little more edge then Spencer in this category. But then again, The Artist may take this category, too, with Berenice Bejo‘s performance. More than ever, I’m wishing I had seen that movie so I wouldn’t feel so begrudged in talking about it’s likely and hypothetical victories.

Best Performance by an Actor In A Supporting Role in a Motion Picture

It’s a strange thing to see Drive finally get a nomination with Albert Brooks in this category. My pick would go to Jonah Hill in Moneyball, although I see Christopher Plummer (Beginners) or Viggo Mortenson (A Dangerous Method) walking away with the trophy before Hill does.

Best Director – Motion Picture

I will admit I’m very biased in this category. First things first: No, George Clooney, I don’t think you should win, much less be nominated in this category. Yes Ides was good, but it wasn’t Best Director nomination-worthy. Second: Despite the hype over Hugo, no, Scorsese, I don’t think just because you decided to make a family film that was largely successful, that you should win this category either. What kid wants to sit in a theater for over two hours when the film is more fitting for adults? That’s what The Muppets is for–to make children laugh and smile and sing and enjoy going to the theater. And get ready for it: No, Mr. Allen, I don’t think you should win either. Yes, you are an incredible writer, director, and storyteller, but you’re also the biggest Academy Darling of those listed, and just because those voters love you doesn’t mean you should win every year you’re nominated. Off your high horse. Which leaves Alexander Payne (The Descendants) and Michel Hazanavicius (The Artist). My gut tells me Hazanavicius is going to walk away with it, and I would be all the happier if he did.

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture

My first choice? Midnight in Paris. The writing is the strength of the film, and I think it’s spectacular. I think Ides should be thrown out the window on this one too. It is likely that The Artist could take this one, too, but then again, so could The Descendants. Moneyball was a nice adaptation, but for those who have read the book (*raises hand*), they know it wasn’t a great representation of the book. It was, however, an excellent way to translate the story for today’s viewers and make something that might not entertain most to something that could now entertain many.

Best Animated Feature Film

The question we should all be asking is, where the heck is Kung Fu Panda 2 on this list? Seriously, Cars 2  was the least successful Pixar film to date, yet it still makes it on the list of nominees. If I were to pick a favorite, it would be Puss in Boots. Then again, I remained unimpressed with this list, considering the great past couple years of animated filmmaking.

Best Foreign Language Film

I have little to nothing to say about this category as well, since I haven’t seen a single film on the list. My only thought is that it’s interesting to see Angelina Jolie’s directorial debut make the list, In the Land of Blood and Honey. But that’s all I have to say about that.

Best Original Score – Motion Picture

There’s a great many popular and suspected composers’ scores on this list, from Howard Shore to John Williams to last year’s Oscar winners, Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross for The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo this time around. I put this category entirely up for grabs.

Best Original Song – Motion Picture

I’m definitely a fan of Mary J. Blige’s The Living Proof from The Help, but I can’t help but get angry at not seeing even a showing for The Muppets on this one. Really? I’m actually stunned. This is a huge disappointment for a film with such great original songs.

And those are my thoughts! What are your biggest disappointments and surprises for this year’s Golden Globes?

The Music That Moves Me

One of my favorite aspects of film, if not my absolute favorite, is the music. I love starting this conversation with my friends. We start talking about film music, and halfway into the conversation, we both realize we’re not talking about the same thing. They’re  thinking soundtrack; I’m specifically thinking film score.

Growing up, I wasn’t exposed to much music. Actually, there were very strict guidelines for what I was and wasn’t allowed to listen to; surprisingly, however, film scores always wiggled their way into my CD player. All the way through high school and mid-college, my likes for film didn’t evolve or grow much past well-known John Williams or Hans Zimmer (two AMAZING composers, though!) albums, but since then I’ve tried to stretch and really appreciate all that is out there. So many talented composers are alive and well and composing for films that are great and films that aren’t, but they’re definitely out there!

Most film score soundtracks I purchase are from films that I’ve watched and was moved by. Marketers know this when hiring certain composers for a type of film. Music bleeds emotion, and when film-goers can exit a theater feeling and experiencing a certain emotion, a composer has accomplished part of his job – leave a lasting memory in the heart of the listener. And while the audience might give all credit to the film itself, the score plays a large role in influencing the film’s audience.

While I’ve also added numerous film soundtracks to my music library, I’m just going to focus on film scores for this post. In no intended order, here is a list of some my favorite film scores:

  1. Eagle Eye – Brian Tyler
  2. The Holiday – Hans Zimmer
  3. 27 Dresses – Randy Edelman
  4. The Wedding Date – Blake Neely (Fun fact [FF]): A physical copy of this record is rare. Only 1,000 copies were ever produced.)
  5. TRON: Legacy – Daft Punk
  6. Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest – Hans Zimmer (Most people assume all three soundtracks were composed by Hans Zimmer. Klaus Badelt composed The Black Pearl. Hans Zimmer and Klaus Badelt worked together for Dead Man’s Chest.)
  7. Elizabethtown – Nancy Wilson (FF: Wilson is married to the Writer-Director of the film, Cameron Crowe. That’s convenient.)
  8. Dan in Real Life – Sondre Lerche (FF: This film score includes a lot of vocals, which is atypical for a score. Lerche also appears in the film, performing for the wedding reception, at the movie’s end. The director mentioned that even if the film flopped, one of his primary goals was to get Sondre Lerche’s music out there!)
  9. Star Trek – Michael Giacchino
  10. Inception – Hans Zimmer
  11. The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King – Howard Shore

I know Hans Zimmer makes my list three times, but this group holds many of my absolute favorites. For me, the music that moves me often comes from the emotional attachment I have with a film. While Star Trek didn’t exactly have me leaving in tears (sarcastic remark: check!), Dan in Real Life, Elizabethtown, and The Wedding Date are three of my favorite films that I’ve not only watched several times each, but I have also connected emotionally with.

My appreciation for film music comes from the thought of walking into a theater and watching a movie with no score. For all those moments that don’t include a soundtrack playing (and there are MANY of them), a film score quietly and discreetly or very poignantly accompanies what we’re viewing. A film wouldn’t be able to move as quickly as it does or make a certain impact without that music.

So next time you walk into a theater, pay close attention when someone isn’t singing or when someone isn’t talking during the movie. Yeah – that’s the sound of the score moving the film, and then the film moving you.