Shame List #8: Roman Holiday (1953)

Roman Holiday is one of 31 films on my Shame List, a list composed of multiple classics and “must-see”- considered films for anyone who likes to consider him/herself a film buff. I created this list with only twenty films, and have added eleven films since by recommendations from friends and fellow movie fans. I’m always looking for recommendations, and my Shame List is my accountability to the moving blogging community that I have – and will – start watching these movies to earn my film buff status. A copy of the list can be found at my post here, and I’m updating per your recommendations, so please keep them coming!


Onto my review of the first film I can cross of my Shame List is Roman Holiday (1953):

When I was watching Roman Holiday, I couldn’t help but enjoy each scene, taking in everything I could. No doubt, it’s a movie I’ll revisit again and again, which confirms my purchase of a DVD copy before I had even seen it.

Growing up, I fondly remember watching Audrey Hepburn play the infamous role of Eliza Doolittle in My Fair Lady (1964), and the image of a dirty, cockney woman turned into a stately, prim and proper socialite was burned into my memory. Years later, following my college years, I decided to give Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961) a try given its reputation. I got to see another well-known side of Hepburn, although I couldn’t help but wonder what the “wow” factor was of the film. But that’s a whole other post altogether.

My only knowledge of Roman Holiday before viewing it is that it starred Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck as the leads, and that they fell in love but never got together. I was excited to see this movie for that little insight alone, yet I was shocked when the movie opened and Hepburn was playing a princess and Peck was working for the press.

The opening scene, as no doubt many have recalled and talked about, is famous for its simplicity: Princess Ann is on the last leg of her European tour. She’s exhausted, yet she knows how to paste on her happy face and polite voice because she’s so accustomed to doing so. She’s just arrived in Rome, about to sit down when a huge line of Roman higher ups and citizens await to greet this famous princess who’s just arrived in town. She’s plays it calm, only occasionally lifting her right foot out of her shoe to ease the strain of standing and walking in heels, when she accidentally nicks her shoe, unable to retrieve it without drawing attention. One by one, her assistants emote looks of panic as they realize the gravity of the situation: with all eyes on the princess, no one can subtly collect her shoe.

And that is just the first of many memorable scenes that make Roman Holiday so sweet, enjoyable, and of course a staple in classic film history and a model for so many romantic comedies. Multiple modern romantic comedies came to mind as I watched Roman Holiday, explaining the inspiration directors and actors have aspired to imitating in the last few decades.

When reviewing Roman Holiday, as well as others on my Shame List, I know I’ll run into a problem Dan realized when he recently reviewed Fight Club (1999) at his blog: it’s hard not to reiterate in a review what everyone else has already said about a critically-revered film that’s already had everything discussed and dissected in it. Roman Holiday is a beloved film, and I’m so happy to experience why everyone else who has seen it appreciates it for its beauty, simplicity, and mark on film history.

Of course, Gregory Peck stands out in this film, not only for his acting skills and his tall, dark handsomeness, but also because he stands head and shoulders above all the other guys. This is especially noticeable in the end scene when he’s standing in the middle of the front line of press writers and photographers. I imagine William Wyler purposefully set the scene so that Peck stood out in the group. That scene also captured how well both lead performers were able to express their characters with just their eyes, and it made me wonder when the last time I was so moved by a scene that said so much without many words.

When Joe Bradley (Gregory Peck) leaves the royal hall, the scene shows one man taking his time as he strides down the beautiful, rich walls that make up just the hall of where royalty presides. After this end scene, I think of the contrast of the earlier scene with Princess Ann entering Bradley’s room for the first time, and even under the influence of a heavy drug that’s taken its toll, she still inquires if his room is the elevator.

Both leads know how to employ physical comedy, and I can imagine Eddie Albert received his share of scrapes and bruises from constantly getting knocked down or pushed over. I don’t think I’ll ever forget Hepburn impaling a guitar by smashing it over the head over a Secret Service agent while fleeing a dance party.

Despite their best efforts and logical influences, Joe and Ann fall in love in front of us, even if it’s just for a few hours. True love isn’t on display until Bradley pretends he never got the story, because he cherishes his time with Ann more than winning a bet and making some much-needed extra cash. Extending the photos as “scenic photos from Rome” as a gift to Ann reveals Irving’s (Eddie Albert) sincerity as well.

I also really enjoyed all of the fashion, especially on Hepburn (no wonder she’s considered a fashion icon). The dress she wears in the final scene is a great example of how beautiful an outfit can be in black and white. Even with her sporting long and short hair styles throughout the film, her face shines without a single imperfection to be spotted, and it’s assuring that’s her fashionable status is well-earned if she just cracks a smile. I doubt her barber (Claudio Ermelli) really acted too much when melting over the gorgeous actress, like most men did in the film.

Roman Holiday is my favorite Audrey Hepburn film I’ve viewed thus far, and it makes me want to see more of her films. I don’t need any more encouragement to view more Gregory Peck films, although Roman Holiday only confirms my need to see him in more.

All images found via Google Images.

I give Roman Holiday 

Eye Art1Eye Art1Eye Art1Eye Art1

ON SCREEN, crossing my first film off my Shame List.

It’s your turn now. What did you think of Roman Holiday? Would you consider it a classic or a must-see film? Or does it make it on your Shame List? Please join the discussion below, because I would love to know your thoughts!

Five Memorable Courtroom Scenes

I feel like I should be writing a “Phenomenal 5” post for Keith of Keith and the Movies, who is currently keeping it real in none other than Paris, France right now. However, inspiration for this post spurned from finally getting around to a little movie called To Kill a Mockingbird. How I have not seen it until now comes as a great surprise to me too. But what’s the line? Oh, right, “better late than never.”

Placed in no purposeful order, here are five memorable courtroom scenes in movies.

To Kill a Mockingbird

The courtroom scene in To Kill a Mockingbird is one of the most intense and emotional scenes in the film. We hear statements from all the witnesses, and Brock Peters, who plays Tom Robinson, gives a heartfelt, honest account of what really happened. Following all the witness accounts, Atticus Finch (Gregory Peck) challenges the jury to do the right thing, concluding his speech with the famous words, “In the name of GOD, do your duty. In the name of God, believe Tom Robinson.”

Legally Blonde

This list would not be complete without including Legally Blonde. Dressed head to toe in her theme color, Elle Woods (Reese Witherspoon) takes on the role of lawyer and solves a case that a girl cut only from the cloth of an Elle Woods type would know. Too bad they went ahead and made a sequel. That was a disaster waiting to happen. And that isn’t me being biased because I’m a brunette, k?

Miracle on 34th Street

What’s more memorable than a lawyer arguing the realness of Santa Clause in court? I actually really enjoyed both the original 1947 film as well as the 1994 remake. You can’t help but feel a little warm and giddy inside when men start carrying all the mail addressed to Santa into the courthouse, or not crack up a little when the opposing lawyer’s son is used to support the existence of good ‘ol Saint Nick.

A Few Good Men

The line “You can’t handle the truth” is one of the most well-known lines to come from a film, delivered by a deliciously slimy and arrogant Jack Nicholson. The back and forth between Lt. Daniel Kaffee (Tom Cruise) and Col. Nathan R. Jessup (Jack Nicholson) engrosses viewers as Kaffee defends innocent men on trial who were following orders. A Few Good Men is one of my favorite Tom Cruise films, and I believe it makes up some of his best work.

Liar Liar

If you’ve seen Liar Liar, it’s practically impossible to forget the courtroom scene from the movie. Fletcher Reed (Jim Carrey) is forced to tell the truth, and well, being a lawyer . . . that doesn’t make easy for your job, especially someone who lies as often as he does. The physical comedy Carrey is able to produce is incomparable, and while over the top, is hilarious and very much a trademark of Carrey’s acting.

What are your favorite courtroom scenes? Which ones are the most memorable to you, and why?

The Ten Best Actors of All Time: Relay Race

All week, I have been MIA from all things AEOS and blogging due to unexpected circumstances, mostly just being incredibly busy. I was planning to really get back into the groove of things this week, having several posts planned for, but this week didn’t turn out how I expected. I promise that starting next week, I will be back. I have major catch-up to play on visiting everyone else’s sites! Apologies for being gone all week.

Today is Good Friday, but it is also my deadline to post for the best actors relay race that Ruth over at Flixchatter handed the baton to me almost a week ago!

Taking a page out of Ruth’s book, here is where the race originated and has moved since it started:

Nostra at My Filmviews started the race.

Nostra handed the baton to Terrence at The Focused Filmographer.

Terrence handed the baton over to Scott at Front Room Cinema.

Scott handed the baton over to my buddy Pete at I Love That Film.

Pete handed the baton over to my friend Ruth at Flixchatter,

Who handed the baton over to me!

Now, for the rules of the race, according to the race’s originator, Nostra:

“So what’s the idea behind the relay? I’ve created a list of what I think are the best actors. At the end of the post I, just like in a real relay race, hand over the baton to another blogger who will write his own post. This blogger will have to remove one actor (that is an obligation) and add his own choice and describe why he/she did this. At the end the blogger chooses another blogger to do the same. The idea is to make this a long race, so that enough bloggers get a chance to remove and add an actor. We will end up with a list (not ranked in order) which represents a common agreement of the best actors”

I will be forthcoming and admit that due to my limited film viewing, that I haven’t seen many of the films which have made so many of these wonderful, celebrated actors the household names they are today. I have seen some here and there, but I’m definitely a little bit limited. So instead of repeating what those in the race have done before me, I will not be mentioning all of the films that made each actor famous.

This is an incredible list, and I’ve been beating my head against the wall trying to decide who to add and who to take away. It wasn’t an easy decision on my end, but I still feel satisfied with my selection. Check out the photos below to see who is currently on the list.

Robert De Niro

Daniel Day-Lewis

Charlie Chaplan

Gary Oldman

Philip Seymour Hoffman

Marlon Brando

Robert Duvall

Christian Bale

Gregory Peck

My Choice: Tom Hanks

Those who have seen one of my more recent posts listing off my top five favorite actors will not be surprised to see that I’m adding Tom Hanks to this list. Choosing Hanks was an easy thing–he’s won two Oscars for his roles in Philadelphia and Forrest Gump. Aside from Spencer Tracy, Hanks is the only actor to have ever won two consecutive Oscars for Best Actor. He’s been nominated three other times for his roles in BigSaving Private Ryan, and Cast Away. And if you take all his critical acclaim away, you still get this versatile actor who, in my opinion, has always had that star quality that enabled him to take on roles from Jim Lovell in Apollo 13 to the animated character Woody in the Toy Story series. Hanks is known as much for his roles in Road to Perdition and The Green Mile as he is for his light roles in classic rom coms such as You’ve Got Mail and Sleepless in Seattle. Hanks is full of charm and charisma, and it’s apparent wherever he goes or in whatever role he plays. Although Hanks hasn’t filled the shoes of any titular character in more recent years, he’s still earned the right to be considered an acting legend in my book.

Who I Replaced: Edward Norton

This was such a difficult decision! Right now, I can imagine my sister, a big fan of Norton, shaking me and telling me I made the wrong choice. However, given the list, it was far more difficult to shed an actor than add one. I absolutely love Norton and think he was especially mind-blowing in Fight Club. I also appreciate that Norton so effortlessly crosses the line between villain and hero roles in films. He plays both sides so well. The main reason Norton is the one I replaced is that what many of the other actors on the list have that Norton doesn’t have is opportunity. At age 42, he was actually the youngest actor on the list with the exception of Christian Bale. With a few more lead roles under his belt, I think Norton has all the potential in the world to be one of the greatest actors of our time.

Following suite with Ruth, I will also be passing the baton onto another girl: Jaina at Time Well Spent. Excited to see who you add (and take away), Jaina!