Trailer Friday – Rock of Ages

For those of you who saw Game of Shadows in theaters last month, probably caught this first Rock of Ages trailer released. Due to open early this summer, Rock of Ages features an A-list cast from Footloose survivor Julianne Hough, to Russell Brand, Alec Baldwin, Bryan Cranston, Chicago‘s Catherine Zeta-Jones, Paul Giamatti, Malin Akerman, Mary J. Blige, and . . . Tom Cruise?

Musically-inclined director Adam Shankman, brushing up after his successful remake (2007) of Broadway musical Hairspray (2002), which was actually based off the 1988 film, will be producing and directing this musically-based film set in the 1980s rock ‘n roll era.

Up and newcomer Diego Boneta will be starring in the film next to Hough. Born in Mexico City, twenty-one-year old Boneta’s list of credits starts at Mexican soap opera Rebelde and carries through a recurring role on the ABC family teen drama, Pretty Little Liars and a guest role on 90210. Rock of Ages will bring his face and name into the Hollywood spotlight for the first time. Shankman even compared the young singer to Zac Efron in Hairspray and Channing Tatum in the first Step Up (2006).

The music alone is reason to go see this film, with it featuring Bon Jovi, Def Leppard, Foreigner, Journey, Poison, and Twisted Sister. The trailer offers just a taste of it with what appears to be a singing battle of Twisted Sister’s “We’re Not Going to Take It” serving as trailer music, with Zeta-Jones on one side and Brand on the other.

Although I haven’t seen the original Rock of Ages anywhere, I did learn that Zeta-Jones’s role was originally made for Shankman’s movie version. As for Cruise, well, with him plugging in “5 hour practice sessions” and his voice being Shankman-deemed “fantastic,” I hope we’ll all be in for a treat come June this year. Even if you don’t like musicals, I’d recommend going just to see Cruise play Stacee Jaxx. He looks hysterical.

Sherlock Holmes 2: All Looks, No Depth

A Game of Shadows reminds me of the pretty girl in the room that every guy wants to meet. She’s hot, she’s confident, she’s available. And then a guy meets her, and within about 10 minutes, he realizes why no guy is wasting his time talking to her: she’s all looks and no substance.

In a nutshell, that’s the best way I can describe the second installment of Guy Ritchie’s Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows.

What Was Good

  • This film was visually appealing in so many ways. My biggest comparison of it was last year’s TRON: Legacy that came out right around the same time. The story line lacked, the writing was weak, but it was pretty to look at. One of the very first scenes in the film where Sherlock Holmes (Robert Downey Jr.) fights off four guys at once was incredible. At one point in the scene, the camera made a complete 360 degree turn. It was visually dazzling. The other memorable scene, visually, was the run through the forest. The slow motion action, the fight sequences, the explosion–by far, one of the most stylistic scenes of the movie. I had thoughts go back to when I had seen 300, but I found myself more enthralled with the visuals and special effects in Game of Shadows than I did in 300 or in the previous Sherlock Holmes installment.
  • Robert Downey Jr. Need I say more? Although I’m of the strong opinion that there are far better British actors out there to portray the famous criminal investigator, RDJ has a special magnetism to crowds of people. He’s funny, he has great facial remarks, and he knows how to make people laugh without blinking. He talks fast, moves fast, and looks good all the while doing so. Although he makes a far better Iron Man than Holmes, he knows how to attract a crowd and then hold its attention.
  • The bromance between RDJ and Jude Law. No one can deny the hilarious chemistry between Holmes and his partner in crime-solving, Dr. Watson. Although Watson is practically forced to accept his sidekick role, he keeps Holmes alive and works as a pretty good support system when needed, be it shooting at people, shooting him with adrenaline, or completing part of a mission. And at the end of the day, there’s this unspoken care for one another.
  • Perhaps one of my favorite parts of this movie were the fight scenes. Not only were they visually appealing, but they were also fun and interesting. The choreography, the narration preceding what RDJ was about to throw down on the villains, and then Professor Moriarty’s interruption in that final narration–all captured and edited well.
  • The ending stayed true to the story. While the movie franchise is utterly miscast, poorly written, and held together by a storyline that is both confusing and disjointed, the ending proved to be a rare part of the movie, with both Sherlock Holmes and the professor falling to their deaths. This is how Arthur Conan Doyle wrote it. And yes, Holmes does come back to life. This is the only scene I would applaud Ritchie for forming.

What Was Bad

  • I’m very disappointed to admit that the soundtrack was a letdown. Hans Zimmer is one of my favorite film composers today, but this soundtrack didn’t do it for me. While it held onto some of the same themes as the first film, it failed to go anywhere beyond that. It was all over the place, and it lacked the build up and the originality of the first soundtrack.
  • The writing is probably the most obvious problem with the film. Difficult to follow, with random things happening, and no one understanding why. Lots of running, fighting, shooting, and overall craziness, but not much point to them. Or is there a point, and we just don’t know it because it’s just bad storytelling? I’m going to have to hand this baton to the screenwriters, Michele and Kieran Mulroney. While the first movie lacked the spunk, thrill, and overall enjoyment that the second offered, Game of Shadows failed to explain itself and decided that looking pretty was a far bigger priority than making much sense or explaining itself.
  • Although the cast really brought it together for this second film, it added great actors, but misused the supporting cast in practically every way. Stephen Fry, who played Holmes’s brother, was funny and added a nice element to the movie. So what’s the problem? In the Sherlock Holmes books, Holmes does have a brother–a twin brother. While this may seem like a nit-picky dislike, the fact that RDJ and Fry share literally no level of similarity in look is just a poor choice. With today’s CGI capabilities, why not use RDJ for his twin? Noomi Rapace, another great addition to the cast, was also poorly used. While she did the best she could with the material, she really had nothing to do except function as an onlooker. This is disappointing when you have such a great physical actress on set. The choice for a better villain was then utilized, bringing Professor Moriarty (Jared Harris) into the story. Harris, portraying an intimidating foe to the much-loved Sherlock Holmes, was great. What wasn’t great is that Moriarty rarely, if ever, talks in the stories. Someone is always playing messenger for him. This is just another big, purposefully-made mistake–we lose the ability to be surprised or taken aback when the villain is constantly showing himself when mystery could have been played well here.
  • Guy Ritchie’s direction is the biggest issue to blame, bad writing taking second place. While he likes making visual beauty on screen, it seems that he wasn’t interested in creating a Sherlock Holmes franchise that is much like Sherlock Holmes in the least. From the onset of poor casting choices, to forcing the stories to be more of summer popcorn flicks with big explosions and witty dialogue than anything much like is true to the story of Sherlock Holmes, Ritchie’s misguided attempts at making a good Sherlock Holmes has proven itself to be a failure once again.
  • As much as I appreciated the ending, as Richard Roeper mentioned in his review, Ritchie decided he rather have the audience leave on a happy note than leave anything to mystery by ending the movie with the return of Sherlock Holmes. As funny as it was, Ritchie blew a great opportunity to leave viewers in the dark and be able to present a great surprise in the next film while leaving everyone in suspense. It’s ironic, seeing that viewers felt completely lost during the movie, but had all suspense removed at the end.

December ’11: Entertainment vs. Oscar Hopefuls

While 2011 hasn’t been an altogether disappointing year for film, it hasn’t entirely sparked a whole new generation of moviegoers to enter the film arena, or blown away even the most dedicated cinefile. Now, that isn’t to say there haven’t been some gems found amidst the crap, or some really decent, fun movies that critics have torn apart for this reason or that, but put it on the month of December to impress viewers the most. The November/December season usually holds the majority of the Best Picture noms as well as many of the other nominations for the upcoming Oscars in February.

For Entertainment Purposes:

1) Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows

Although the first SH in this series was pretty good, the only hit for it at the Oscars was its score by Hans Zimmer (which was very new and original). Although I’d love to see a movie like this gather some Oscar chatter, I don’t consider it a possibility given RDJ’s askew British accent and the film’s focus on more comedy/entertainment than story line (see either trailer to get a good look at RDJ dressed as a woman for one of his disguises). Unfortunately (or perhaps fortunate) for RDJ, his sarcasm and sense of humor has taken the lead in marketing for the more recent movies he has been or will be in (see both Iron Mans, trailer(s) for Game of Shadows, trailer for The Avengers). The special effects, however, do look pretty incredible, and the cinematography looks similar to the likes of 300, as well as the previous SH.

2) Mission Impossible 4: Ghost Protocol

While I’m tired of hearing the argument–how can there be one, much less MULTIPLE impossible missions–I do respect the point and have to give it a little credit. This fourth movie in the franchise, however, looks promising as well as ending for the series, at least when it comes to Tom Cruise’s role as Ethan Hunt. The story line looks promising and more complex than past movies, and the stunts look even bigger and crazier. My hope is that the series ends after this film without a new start-up starring Jeremy Renner (geez, he’s already started that with The Bourne Series, let’s not do this with MI too!).

3) The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo

From what I’ve heard, the Swedes have done this series right in every way, and now we’ll see whether America can follow suite with the fictional book series and do it justice. Although there’s possibility for this movie to touch the Academy (past series have done so before–LOTR!), the odds are not in the favor of a fictional book-to-film adaptation unless you’re Peter Jackson. Still, this movie looks entertaining and interesting and different, and it looks like there’s a great cast ready to tell the story.

Oscar Hopefuls:

1) Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy

Now when I call them “Oscar Hopefuls,” I mean that I hope that these films do something at the Oscars. And I think they have a good possibility as well. I wrote more about this movie in this post. I do think its talented British cast and interesting storyline, if well-played out, could possibly touch the Academy. The Brits have been reeling (pun intended) about this movie, and many critics have already awarded high marks to this movie since its earlier release in the UK.

2) The Iron Lady

Of all the movies I have listed, this is the film I have read or heard the least chatter about. For a political film starring Meryl Streep, I’m practically stunned that I’ve heard so little about this film. Streep has phoned in multiple Oscar-nominated (and won) performances, and it’s doubtful that this one will not join her other remarkable and stunning performances. Coupled with coming out during Oscar season and being part of a political thriller genre, it’s setting up all the right moves for gaining it’s own slot in the awards season. Stay tuned and watch out for this movie. I have a good feeling about this one.

3) We Bought a Zoo

I also wrote more about this movie in this post. Although Crowe has yet to get a film talked about at the Academy since Almost Famous, I think We Bought a Zoo has great potential. The Crowe and Damon alliance has happened for the first time, and it could reap great results. Crowe’s real-life, person-centered storytelling honed in, with the right cast, could earn him a spot.

4) Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

This is surprisingly my first mention of this film. The trailer for this movie kind of came out of nowhere for me, and having people like Tom Hanks and Sandra Bullock head this project makes that especially shocking. A new take and perspective on 9/11, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close is already making viewers cry during the preview. I really look forward to this movie and could see it moving critics as well.

That’s my take on December! I’ve certainly seen a share of entertaining and critical films that have already been talked about for the next Oscar season. We’ll see what December holds for moviegoers. What are looking forward to watching the most this month? And do you think any of the films listed (or others not listed) have Oscar potential?

I Would Like to Thank the Trailer Makers

. . . for the awesome music that they put in trailers.

As of late, I’ve made some new introductions with bands, thanks to some great music selections put in trailers.

“Everything in Its Right Place” by Radiohead in the Anonymous trailer

Radiohead is clearly capable of making some great music, and the movie trailer business had benefited greatly from their talent. The first Radiohead song I was really blown away by in a movie trailer was “Creep,” performed by The Vega Choir in The Social Network trailer. To this day, I think it is one of the best trailers, thanks in part to that song.

“Infinite Legends” by Two Steps from Hell in the Breaking Dawn Pt. 1 trailer

Although I’m not a Twilight fan, I was really curious to find out who performed the song in the trailer. Two Steps from Hell has made quite a few creative songs in both their albums, Invisible and Archangel.

“Unstoppable” by E. S. Posthumus in the Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows trailer

E. S. Posthumus is considered an electronic music group. I really loved the use of this song, especially in the second trailer that came out for A Game of Shadows. Their interesting use of different instruments really brings the trailer to life.