Shame List #25: The Shining (1980)

Shame List Introduction

The Shining is one of 31 films on my Shame List, a list composed of multiple classics and “must-see”- considered films for anyone who likes to consider him/herself a film buff. I created this list with only twenty films, and have added eleven films since by recommendations from friends and fellow movie fans. I’m always looking for recommendations, and my Shame List is my accountability to the movie blogging community that I have – and will – start watching these movies to earn my film buff status. A copy of the list can be found at my post here, and I’m updating per your recommendations, so please keep them coming!


Here’s my review of the third film I can cross off my Shame List:

I feel like I can wash my hands of the “shame” a bit after finally viewing The Shining (1980) for the first time. I always wondered where that haunting image of young Jack Nicholson originated. For someone who has seen movies of him only in his older years when he’s sporting gray hair, it was both a pleasure and a horror to see Nicholson in action in this classic horror film.

So I caught this movie back in October, right around Halloween. But I missed out on posting about it right when it was trendy to do so. So as Thanksgiving approaches with Christmas directly on its heels, here’s just a little summary of my thoughts on the classic horror film, The Shining.

Everyone has stuff to say about this movie. And nothing in this post is going to be purely original regarding the film. I truly wasn’t expecting what I saw, and that was probably what gave me the most joy in seeing it. It’s about a madman portrayed by Jack Nicholson, and frankly, with his balding head and crazy eyes, he seemed to have the role down pat.

It’s common knowledge that Stephen King didn’t care for this film adaptation by Stanley Kubrick. Having not read the book myself, I could only naively say that this is a good stand-alone film. Give me the original source material, and perhaps I could say otherwise. But at the end of the day, we’re talking two different mediums, two different viewpoints, and two different pieces of art. And I liked The Shining, even if didn’t pay the proper homage King was expecting or hoping for from Kubrick.

I think what makes the film so good, so iconic, are the performances alongside the eery score and setting. While there ought to be plenty of praise for the lead Jack Nicholson, I was most moved by Danny Lloyd’s performance of Danny, especially when his “friend in his mouth” took over. Children certainly have the chops to play multi-dimensional characters, and Lloyd’s portrayal was chilling.

I’ve wondered if Shelley Duvall has received as much praise as her costars, because she really does play the character that the audience relates with and roots for. For a while, I chalked her up to a simple housewife who didn’t know how to stand on her own. But of course, as time goes by and her husband has truly cracked and gone over to the side of madness, her character, Wendy, does take charge. It was so refreshing to see another female character be strong and courageous.

The Shining Maze

The maze played one of the most interesting set pieces I’ve seen in a film. We get to see it in both the fall and winter seasons, and I think the contrast in seeing it in both weathers really characterized the maze as either fun or terrifying. The hotel plays its own role in the film as both a haven and a terror for the characters, by playing monster to Wendy and Danny, and partner-in-crime to Jack when he starts to see visions of those who used to run the hotel.

While it seems like multiple people contributed to both the score and soundtrack, a large part of the job fell on the shoulders of music editor Gordon Stainforth, and I think he really delivered in matching the music passages to the scenes in the film.

Kubrick truly doesn’t let any one part of the film go to waste, having pulled out the stops in every area. It’s clear why The Shining has reached its iconic status. While it wasn’t necessarily my favorite film, it is one I would definitely revisit over the Halloween holiday. I recently read there were multiple scenes cut from the film, and I think that was a wise decision. At nearly two and a half hours, the run time had me getting a little impatient as the story built to its final act, and the race for Wendy and Danny to escape came to a halt.

I give The Shining

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ON SCREEN.

 

It’s your turn now. What do you think of The Shining? Do you think King is justified in his disdain for this film adaptation? Where does The Shining rank on Stanley Kubrick’s filmography? And last, but certainly not least, what movie should I watch and cross off my Shame List next (list here)?

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Trailer Break: Mockingjay Part 1 (2014)

Happy Thursday, all! The latest trailer to make a splash on the Internet is for the next Hunger Games installment, Mockingjay Part 1 (2014), its U.S. premiere only two months away! We’ve seen multiple teasers, but we’re finally getting a a little more footage in this latest trailer.

While I’m excited for this next HG movie, I can’t help but be a bit skeptical about this film just because it’s dividing one book into two movies. As we’ve all seen before, usually the Part 1 movie is dull because it’s lacks the excitement, action, and climax of the story. Part 1 films exist as the “calm before the storm,” so to say. Regardless of what may be the stereotype, the latest trailer boasts an action-packed movie filled with excitement.

Check it out and decide for yourself:

 

“Miss Everdeen, it’s the things we love most that destroy us.”

Definitely get chills when I hear that line! I’m glad to see they’re adding some action to this movie. I’m expecting more drama from this film, because the major action scenes come primarily in the second half of the book.

In addition to a new trailer, there are some great official posters floating around recently. You can find the rest of them at Rotten Tomatoes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Images found via Google Images.

It’s your turn. What do you think of the latest trailer of Mockingjay Part 1? Are you planning to see it in theaters come November? Please join the discussion below, because I would love to know your thoughts.

Trailer Friday – The Raven

When you hear the name John Cusack, you do not think character role. You do not think historical character, and you most certainly do not think historical character role. Why? Because it’s John Cusack. John Cusack is the guy in the rom coms, holding the stereo over his head to get the girl in Cameron Crowe’s Say Anything (1989) or leaving fate to decide his destiny in Serendipity (2001). Yes, Cusack has filled various roles over his long career, such as a Jewish art dealer in Max (2002) or as a puppeteer in the Oscar-nominated Being John Malkovich (1999). He’s even in dipped his toes in the screenwriting business when he co-wrote and starred in the political film War, Inc (2008).

No matter how you look at it though, his most well-known roles are romantic comedies or thrillers such as the over-the-top 2012 from 2009. Cusack is your everyman who looks and talks the same in just about everything he’s in. He’s usually very likable, but it seems like there’s often an “X-factor” that he’s lacking. Or maybe it’s that most of us are so accustomed to watching him play the underdog, that his talent is far more underrated. Born in Chicago, Cusack has retained a low profile, staying out of the media limelight.

And now we have this awesome trailer for The Raven, which actually came out in early October of last year. Perhaps I was sleeping or completely unaware of its release, but after a viewing, I was immediately pulled in. Now I have to see this movie. From the trailer, one can assume a few things:

–John Cusack is playing the legendary Edgar Allen Poe

–The movie is more of an action/thriller than a drama

–There’s a story being told here that is atypical of what many of us assume Edgar Allen Poe is about

Cusack’s done the thrillers before, as well as portrayed a writer in Stephen King’s adapted book-to-movie 1408 (2008), and now he’s playing the historically dark and edgy writer Edgar Allen Poe. As someone commented on the YouTube video, the movie appears to have a very Sherlock Holmes-like feel and look to it, as well as similar type story line.

Director James McTeigue is no stranger to the action genre, having assisted in directing both Matrix sequels (1999, 2003), V for Vendetta (2005), and Star Wars: Attack of the Clones (2002). Watch for The Raven to open in theaters March 9.

Still Buzzed from the Complexity of Inception

It’s December. It’s the end of the year, and in terms of the film world, the best movies–and potentially the most Oscar-nominated-hopefuls–are rounding themselves out this month. And along with those movies, we also have Christmas-themed movies as well as big entertainment blocks for the holiday crowd that comes in during the month.

I was thinking about what my next post should be about, and I couldn’t get Inception out of my mind (pun not intended). I recently bought the Blu-ray copy of it (finally got a Blu-ray player!), and watched all the extras on the disc. I still haven’t gotten to seeing the movie this year yet (and it’s almost over!), but I plan to have at least one more viewing (in addition to my four theater visits last year) before year’s end.

Last year, when the movie first came out, I was blown away. I hadn’t seen a film like this in a really long time, and at the same time, I was moved by the emotional tone of it. That, with the complexity and the beautiful visuals and the creativity, I wondered if I had ever seen such an awesome film on screen. Since then, I have waited to be “blown away” by another film. I went to the last Harry Potter flick and attended screenings of all the big superhero films and the action movies of the summer. I didn’t really care if other films didn’t include the complexity that Inception contains–I was just waiting to experience that “blown away” (in a good way) feeling from watching a movie. Most people experience this feeling from time to time in different amounts–it’s common, although depending on the person, it doesn’t come around very often.

The closest I have come this year to feeling that “blown away” feeling was from seeing 50/50. It’s nothing like Inception in any way or context (oh wait, I guess it has JGL in it too), but it was one of those movies that was marketed to be a bro comedy, and when the credits started rolling, I sat there, stunned at how moved I was from it. The feeling that you get when you might have average expectations, and when you leave the theater, you realize you were completely wrong for not having the highest of expectations from a film because it was just that good when you saw it.

But even so, 50/50 doesn’t shine a light to that “blown away” feeling that I experienced after seeing Inception. Perhaps it is because there was no Nolan film to fill the year, and I’m especially attracted to his style of filmmaking. I still remember seeing The Prestige a few years back and thinking about what a great movie it was. And no one should be able to say that they weren’t at least partly impressed with both Batman Begins and The Dark Knight. All three of those movies have been ranked on my top list for a while now. When I saw Memento, I wondered if there was a more complex film ever even created. CNolan has a sharp, dark, and tight filmmaking style that makes his movies dark, monumental, and beautiful simultaneously. I just hope people’s expectations don’t break through the roof before The Dark Knight Rises hits theaters.

All of that to say–I look forward to breaking that Inception ice and being blown away by another film, even if I have somewhat high expectations going in to see a screening of it. But until then, I remained buzzed from the sheer greatness of Inception, and perhaps secretly wonder if another movie will ever make me feel like that again.

The Man. The Movies. The Memento.

There’s been a lot of hype recently (especially today) about how Christopher Nolan has been snubbed once again – this time, by that warped Academy that makes all the decisions concerning the Oscars. This time around, it’s the 83rd Oscars, and Nolan has been rejected his much-deserved honor of being a Best Director nominee.

So instead of harping on the constant snubbing from said Hollywood Foreign Press Association and American Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, let’s remember why we love CNolan.  After all, being snubbed means you must be pretty darn good at what you’re doing in the first place.

Far more than a triple threat. Yes, we all know he’s a fantastic director. But he’s also a screenwriter. And a producer. And a cinematographer and an editor (Following, Doodlebug).

Has a handful of quality A-listing actors to fill his movies with (Michael Caine, Christian Bale, Tom Hardy, and Cillian Murphy to name a few).

Created the most popular, and by many, considered the best Batman series thus far.

Established connections with professionals within multiple film fields: Hans Zimmer, composer; Emma Thomas (his wife), producer; Lee Smith, film editor; Jonathan Nolan (his brother), screenwriter.

Takes complex ideas and adapts them for the average film-goer. (MementoThe Prestige, and Inception).

Nolan’s IMDB file and Wikipedia (for what it’s worth) contain a lot of this information, but more and more of it is becoming knowledge among even amateur movie-goers. It was Christopher Nolan’s name, not Leonardo DiCaprio’s that brought people into the theater to see Inception, his latest flick, this past summer.

Check out the textual part of a common Inception poster: 

The words “From the Director of The Dark Knight” stick out. And while Leo’s name is in bright lights as well, it was the obscure, ambiguous trailer and the idea that the director of The Dark Knight could create another film as high quality as The Dark Knight, that made the film compelling enough to go see. Judging by most critics’ and audience’s reviews, it was.

Nolan may not have the nod of the Academy, but he has fans. And their respect.