Shameless Advertisement: Movie Blogs I’m Reading

I have to give a lot of credit to other people out there, because many of them are my inspiration for writing about a mutual love: movies. I started blogging for the first time back in high school, right before I graduated. I didn’t really know what I was doing and I lacked a lot of direction. And although I haven’t discovered or learned all the ins and outs of writing, film, or writing about film, I can say that I have learned a lot in the past 6 years, especially thanks to reading other people’s blogs and getting inspired by their passion, comedy, and interests.

So without further ado, read on and feel free to check out some of these awesome movie sites.

Two Cranky Guys: As their tagline says it, these two guys “wade through the crap so you don’t have to.” These two guys have great back and forth dialogue reviewing the latest film each have seen. It’s entertaining and light-hearted. I always looks forward to reading these guys’ take. In recent news, it appears the duo may be breaking up over the latest movie they saw, Breaking Dawn Pt. 1. Check out the blog for more details!

Anomalous Material: This has become a site I check daily. There are tons of new updates, reviews, and discussions going on that make this site a great place for anyone casually to seriously interested in reading about or discussing movies. There are multiple people who write and run the site, so you get a varied perspective and multiple updates and reviews on current and past movies. I love reading new articles and commenting on them, and I’d recommend this site to just about anyone.

FlixChatter: I don’t remember if I found this blog through Freshly Pressed or just by perusing WordPress blogs, but I’m happy I did. The author, Ruth, posts daily on all types of film-like chatter, from upcoming movie news, to specific actors or films she’s reviewed, to interesting facts about certain movies. It was through her blog that I came into contact with Anomalous Material and the community of film bloggers there. So I am definitely indebted to her. She runs a great blog constantly updated with interesting material–be sure to check it out!

Honorable Mentions:

Splatter: on FILM

TheFilmLounge

The Movie Brothers

Urban Dictionary Defines “Movie Snobs”: How Do I Add Up?

What makes a person a “movie snob”? Urban Dictionary defines one as the following:

The way you can tell if someone is a movie snob is by asking them what they like to do in their spare time. If they say “movies” they are normal people. If they say “film” they are movie snobs. Movie snobs are the kind of people who go see a movie like Spiderman and then whine that it’s unrealistic because there’s no way a real person could get bit by a spider and be able to fly from building to building.

I love this definition–it cracks me up. UD has a way of blatantly giving an opinionated description of something/someone. OK, let’s break apart that definition and get down to the nitty gritty here.

Terms: “Film” vs. “Movie” (1/1)

So according to that definition, I’m a snob because I use the word “film” interchangeably with “movie,” although I learned in film class (come on, it was called Intro to Film!) that movies should actually be referred to as movies, a.k.a., moving pictures (or motion pictures) because film reels are no longer used, similarly to photography, where digital cameras are all that are used anymore instead of old school cameras with film that needs to be developed.

Spiderman: Unrealistic? (1/2)

According to this part of the definition, I am not a snob (“Phew!” *wipes brow*). According to my film (oops . . . did it again!) teacher, and something I have always believed but never have had quite the right words to express it, is that movies are all about context. Movies, or film (forget it, I’m going to use the term! Dang it!!) is an art. It’s an expression. While the thought or idea may be original, the means (or methods) with which those originals thoughts and ideas are brought about to be shown are not original. They are recycled, and often are just imitations. There’s certainly nothing wrong with this. My point? Stop expecting film to be 100% realistic–it’s not. And often, it purposefully leaves out realistic concepts for very specific purposes, such as comedy, appearance, or dramatic effect.

Although, I have met many people who are somewhere near both extremes of the realism argument. The “it just isn’t real enough for me” side often like movies based off true stories, or dramas. No problem there. The issue with their thinking, however, is that they think less of movies that are based off ideas of fantasy, fiction book-to-film adaptations, or movies derived from original concepts (such as Inception). Obviously, this is a stereotype, and many times this is just a person’s preference.

The other side is far over into the world of “I’ve seen every Star Wars/Batman/Anime movie/episode and you’re an idiot if you don’t know all the details and share my opinion.” Again, this is an extreme view, and more than likely, most people don’t quite fit that bill, but are closer to that side of the spectrum than the other. These people usually have seen every version of certain said movies/series/trilogies and look down on those of us silly enough to not have clocked in enough couch/screen time into the same series.

No matter how you look at it, everyone has their preferences–what they prefer to see, what they think is worth their time, and what they consider “good” while the rest is “bad.” Movies is a such a subjective topic, from the general idea itself right down to the specific details of a particular film.

The Other Part of the Definition That Isn’t Included Above

You can usually find movie snobs posting 1000 messages a minute on imdb.com trying to make themselves look smarter than other people and telling everyone else they are using bad grammar. Chances are they are in their mid-20s, don’t have jobs, and live in their mom’s basement. They might try to make independent movies but don’t realize that everyone else thinks their movies are terrible.

IMDB.com (1/3)

Perhaps this is sad in the eyes of film geeks, but I do not have an IMDB account. So perhaps I remain unscathed from UD’s “movie snob” definition at this point too. But I do think IMDB’s site is a great resource and I use it often (also, a shoutout to Rotten Tomatoes, which is one of my favorite movie sites). I do have friends who have IMDB accounts and don’t think anything less of them. I guess I just haven’t met anyone who does that . . . at least I haven’t met anyone like that yet!

Bad Grammar (2/4)

Uh-oh. Being an editor, I might as well say this qualifies me as a snob, even in terms of UD’s definition. What I will say is that unless something is genuinely funny due to a grammatical mistake, I do my best to never point it out. I will say that often my opinion of someone can be lessened when he/she writes a post FILLED with grammatical and spelling mistakes. I do realize, however, that no on is immune to making grammatical mistakes, especially those who post often on blogs or sites. No one’s perfect when it comes to writing, and I understand that. It does crack me up that UD includes correcting other people’s grammar in their definition of “movie snob.”

Living Predicament (2.5/5)

Yes, I am in my mid-20s. But no, I do have a job–2 actually. And a third one if you count self-hire (teach piano lessons/ tutor kids). And no, I do not live in my mom’s basement–I live in my own apartment that I pay rent for each month. So in this sense, I do not live the life of UD’s “movie snob.”

Independent Filmmaker Amateur? (3/6)

I also pass with flying colors on this mark, although I almost rather deal with the snob part in this one. I’ve never attempted to make my own independent film. I’ve had interest in it, as well as started writing some scripts for ones, but nothing has ever come through. I have upcoming big plans to start in the future, though! The irony of this point is that although oftentimes beginning indie filmmakers’ work isn’t that great, it’s typically not a secret to that person. When someone starts out, clearly their best work doesn’t usually happen at the very beginning. You have to make mistakes to learn how to be better at something. That’s my take on it!

My Total Score is 3/6 = 50% Movie Snob on the Urban Dictionary Scale

How do you add up on this scale? Are you what Urban Dictionary defines as a “movie snob”?